Webinars

A panel discussion with health researchers and clinicians about how to integrate with cardiac rehabilitation services.
Date: August 05, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Casey Cavanagh, PhD; Joel Hughes, PhD; Megan Mc Murray, PhD; Eva Serber, PhD; and Matthew Whited, PhD

               

Several members of the CVD SIG have asked officers for advice about how to become integrated with cardiac rehab in order to expand their clinical and research scope. These are requests by early career clinicians and researchers, to which we have responded by having individual meetings and offering our advice. We perceived the need for a webinar to reach a broader audience and also to bring in more experiences by researchers and clinicians who have successfully integrated with cardiac rehab. We will solicit questions from the CVD SIG for panelists in advance of the webinar and also have a live panel discussion with participants. Each panelist will give a brief overview of their experiences prior to the question and answer segment. Panelists are all members of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and this webinar is part of the CVD SIG’s efforts to create collaboration between our two societies.

Casey Cavanagh;I earned my PhD in psychology at West Virginia University, where my research primarily focused on cardiovascular reactivity and recovery from stress. I completed my pre-doctoral internship, specializing in integrated primary care, at Denver Health Medical Center. After internship, I completed an APA approved fellowship in Clinical Health Psychology, followed by a two year fellowship in health services research and development at VA Connecticut Healthcare System and Yale School of Medicine. My research has shifted to a focus on development and implementation of patient-centered care and communication, particularly around difficult conversations, among patients with cardiovascular disease. In September 2019 I started my position at the University of Virginia School of Medicine as an Assistant Professor and the Co-Director of the Behavioral Medicine Consultation-Liaison service. In these roles, I am developing cardiovascular behavioral medicine clinics, groups, and collaborating on research.|

Twitter Handle: @DrCaseyCavanagh

Joel Hughes; PhD, FAACVPR, is Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training at Kent State University. Dr. Hughes received his PhD in clinical psychology at The Ohio State University, where he studied cardiopulmonary behavioral medicine with AACVPR fellow Charles Emery. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Hughes is a licensed psychologist whose research interests focus on psychological factors in heart disease. 

Megan McMurray; PhD, ABPP is an Assistant Professor and rehabilitation psychologist in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Medicine. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at The University of South Florida at Tampa and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at UAB Medicine in rehabilitation psychology. Dr. McMurray is a licensed clinical psychologist and is board certified in rehabilitation psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP). A significant portion of Dr. McMurray’s outpatient practice is devoted to providing behavioral health services for patients enrolled in the UAB Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation program. These services include individual behavioral health consults, individual psychotherapy, support groups, and psychoeducation classes on various wellness topics pertinent to this population (e.g., cognitive-behavioral strategies for stress and weight management). Dr. McMurray currently serves as president of the Southern Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (SACPR).

Dr. Serber is a clinical health psychologist and Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Biobehavioral Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina.  She has been principal investigator for two NHLBI-funded clinical trials “Positive Psychotherapy to Improve Autonomic Function and Mood in ICD Patients (PAM-ICD)” [R34 HL107733-01A1] and “Cardiac Autonomic Regulation Enhancement Through Exercise Trial (CARE-E)” [R21 HL092340]. Dr. Serber has expertise in the content areas of positive and negative emotion and stress response, patients with cardiovascular disease including arrhythmias treated with ICDs, and research in examining autonomic function in relation to behavior. Clinically, Dr. Serber has worked in integrated care models since 2001. She is currently the staff psychologist for Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Programs, Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program, Heart Transplant Selection Committee and Ventricular Assist Device Center for Excellence at MUSC. Dr. Serber serves on the Psychology Education Committee for the Internship program. She is also the Associate Director of Education and Training and the Associate Co-Director of Clinical Operations for the Division of Bio-behavioral Medicine. Dr. Serber is a supervisor for Behavioral Medicine rotation in the Behavioral Medicine Clinic for the Charleston Consortium Psychology Internship Program, along with supervising postdoctoral fellows. Dr. Serber is currently active in both clinical research and providing clinical patient care.

Dr. Whited; is an Associate Professor at East Carolina University and a licensed psychologist. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from West Virginia University and did his postdoctoral fellowship in behavioral medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Currently he is focused on training the next generation of exceptional health psychologists in the Health Psychology PhD program at ECU. His research centers around behavioral factors related to cardiovascular disease with a focus on improving behavioral health interventions integrated into the cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation setting. He is a founder and past chair of the cardiovascular disease special interest group of the Society of Behavioral Medicine and is a member of the behavioral health and nutrition subgroup of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

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A panel discussion with health researchers and clinicians about how to integrate with various CVD services.
Date: August 19, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Casey Cavanagh, PhD; Kate Cutitta, PhD; Allison Gaffey, PhD; Christine Mason, PhD; Lindsey Rosman, PhD; Alyssa Vela, PhD; and Matthew Whited, PhD.
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

                         

               
 

Several members of the CVD SIG have asked officers for advice about how to become integrated with CVD clinics in order to expand their clinical and research scope. These are requests by early career clinicians and researchers, to which we have responded by having individual meetings and offering our advice. We perceived the need for a webinar to reach a broader audience and also to bring in more experiences by researchers and clinicians who have successfully integrated with CVD clinics. We will solicit questions from the CVD SIG for panelists in advance of the webinar and also have a live panel discussion with participants. Each panelist will give a brief overview of their experiences prior to the question and answer segment.

Casey Cavanagh;I earned my PhD in psychology at West Virginia University, where my research primarily focused on cardiovascular reactivity and recovery from stress. I completed my pre-doctoral internship, specializing in integrated primary care, at Denver Health Medical Center. After internship, I completed an APA approved fellowship in Clinical Health Psychology, followed by a two year fellowship in health services research and development at VA Connecticut Healthcare System and Yale School of Medicine. My research has shifted to a focus on development and implementation of patient-centered care and communication, particularly around difficult conversations, among patients with cardiovascular disease. In September 2019 I started my position at the University of Virginia School of Medicine as an Assistant Professor and the Co-Director of the Behavioral Medicine Consultation-Liaison service. In these roles, I am developing cardiovascular behavioral medicine clinics, groups, and collaborating on research.|

Twitter Handle: @DrCaseyCavanagh

Katherine Cutitta, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine and serves as the dedicated clinical health psychologist for the Heart Center at Texas Children’s Hospital. She serves patients of the Heart Center, including pediatric patients with congenital heart defects and other presentations of heart disease (e.g. cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and arrhythmia) as well as the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population managing congenital heart disease and subsequent sequelae.

Dr. Cutitta completed a one-year health psychology internship in the Department of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine. After earning her PhD in Health Psychology with a concentration in Clinical Health at East Carolina University, she completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Cutitta advocated for a dedicated Psychologist for the Heart Center following completion of her fellowship and has worked to develop and expand available clinical services at Texas Children’s Hospital since 2018.

Allison Gaffey, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Yale School of Medicine and VA Connecticut Healthcare System. Her clinical interests focus on hypertension and cardiovascular prevention and women’s cardiovascular health, including women who are Veterans. Dr. Gaffey’s research interests pertain to the roles of stress, trauma, and sleep in cardiovascular disease, and sex differences in those factors and related pathophysiology.

Dr. Gaffey completed a one-year health psychology internship at the Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University. After earning her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Notre Dame, she completed a two-year clinical fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Rush University Medical Center.

Dr. Christine Smith-Mason, Ph.D. works a clinical health psychologist with the Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine team at Wellstar Health System in Marietta, Georgia in the suburbs of Atlanta. She received her Ph.D. in Health Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, completed an internship in Clinical Health Psychology from Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan, and concluded her training with a postdoctoral fellowship in Health and Bariatric Psychology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois. Specific areas of interest and expertise include health behavior change in the context of cardiovascular illnesses, including nonpharmacological interventions for sleep disorders, obesity/weight management, and medication/treatment adherence.

Clinically, Dr. Smith-Mason’s responsibilities include pre-surgical evaluations for left ventricular assistive device (LVAD) implantation, inpatient consultations for medically hospitalized patients with heart failure and advanced heart failure, and outpatient psychotherapy and health and behavior interventions for patients under the care of a cardiologist. Current research focuses on psychosocial predictors of Left Ventricular Device outcomes and poor sleep quality among cardiovascular medicine patients. In addition, she is working with stakeholders to research and implement a pilot program integrating psychological consultation for heart failure patients to identify cognitive, psychiatric, social, and behavioral issues that may contribute to multiple hospital readmissions, with the goal of intervention and prevention of rehospitalization.

Dr. Lindsey Rosman is a licensed Clinical Health Psychologist and an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology (Clinical Electrophysiology) at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Her research is currently funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health and focuses on the use of longitudinal clinical databases and prospective cohort studies to examine modifiable risk factors, care patterns, and clinical outcomes in patients with arrhythmias and implanted cardiac devices. She is also the Director of the Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine Service at UNC Cardiology.

Dr. Alyssa Vela is an Assistant Professor of Surgery and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine and a Clinical Health Psychologist with the Cardiac Behavioral Medicine Service at Northwestern Medicine. Dr. Vela is a graduate of the Health Psychology PhD program at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She completed her residency at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center and a fellowship in Clinical Health Psychology with an emphasis in medical education at the Michigan Center for Advanced Psychology Training. Her clinical and research interests include prevention and treatment of cardiometabolic conditions. She is also passionate about addressing issues related to diversity and health disparities in medicine and medical education, with a focus on culturally-considerate communication.

Dr. Whited; is an Associate Professor at East Carolina University and a licensed psychologist. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from West Virginia University and did his postdoctoral fellowship in behavioral medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Currently he is focused on training the next generation of exceptional health psychologists in the Health Psychology PhD program at ECU. His research centers around behavioral factors related to cardiovascular disease with a focus on improving behavioral health interventions integrated into the cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation setting. He is a founder and past chair of the cardiovascular disease special interest group of the Society of Behavioral Medicine and is a member of the behavioral health and nutrition subgroup of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

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Preparing for a Job Search in the Post-Pandemic World
Date: August 26, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Simon Craddock Lee, PhD, MPH; Jill Koshiol, PhD; and Damali Martin, PhD, MPH
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

     

The academic job market has shifted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its subsequent financial challenges, and many early-career investigators are encountering multiple obstacles to identifying and securing their first job after training. This webinar brings together academic researchers who were on the job market during the 2008/2009 financial crisis. Discussing their own experiences on the job market during this time, the panelists will provide useful tips, tricks, and insights for individuals currently on the job market. Each of the panelists will also incorporate their current perspectives as senior-level researchers in both academia and government in providing advice to early-career researchers. Finally, the webinar will place an emphasis on addressing the pressing job search-related concerns of audience members, and questions from the audience will be collected and utilized throughout the panel presentation.

Simon Craddock Lee, PhD MPH is a medical anthropologist with postgraduate training in cancer control and prevention. He is Associate Professor of Population & Data Sciences with tenure at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Co-Leader of the Population Science & Cancer Control research program for the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. He was recruited to Dallas in 2008 following four years as a Cancer Prevention Fellow at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, MD.

Dr. Lee's research focuses on mixed-methods implementation research to advance cancer healthcare delivery in safety-net settings, urban and rural. Dr. Lee advocates for research partnerships that foster learning health systems and other collaborations that enable science to support community priorities. He is advancing this agenda in North Texas as Associate Director for community and collaboration for the CTSA-funded Center for Translational Medicine.  An Associate Editor of Annals of Family Medicine, he also serves on the editorial board of Journal of Cancer Survivorship.

A Yale graduate, Dr. Lee received his MPH from the University of California, Berkeley and his doctorate from the Joint Program in Medical Anthropology at University of California, San Francisco and Berkeley. A Fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology, he has held multiple leadership positions in the American Anthropological Association.

Dr. Jill Koshiol received her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School in 2005 and subsequently joined the National Cancer Institute. She is a Senior Investigator in the Infections and Immunoepidemiology Branch of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. Her research program is focused on the etiology of hepatobiliary cancers, especially biliary tract cancers, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and ampulla of Vater cancer.

Biliary tract cancers are rare in much of the world, but there are hotspots where these cancers constitute a major public health burden. Biliary tract cancers have a multifactorial etiology. Inflammation is likely a major component, but also previously unknown risk factors, such as aflatoxin. Identification of such determinants, as well as biomarkers, may lead to new opportunities for cancer prevention and early detection that can be translated into public health impact, particularly in high-risk areas.

Dr. Damali Martin is a Program Director in the Populations and Genetics Branch in the Division of Neurosciences.  She oversees a portfolio of grants related to population studies of Alzheimer’s Disease and other related dementia, with a focus on disparities and global health. Prior to joining NIA, Dr. Martin served as a Senior Program Director, the Cancer Disparities Coordinator and the Global Health Coordinator in the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program in NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS) for 12 years. Her responsibilities included managing a portfolio of large multi-center cancer epidemiology and cohort studies related to health disparities, global health, environmental and genetic epidemiology.

As the Cancer Disparities Coordinator, Dr. Martin worked with trans-NCI staff to provide oversight of activities and to envision strategic opportunities for advancing cancer disparities research. As the Global Health Coordinator, Dr. Martin spearheaded several global health initiatives in the Caribbean and Africa including an assessment of non-Latin Caribbean country policies and services for cervical cancer prevention and control, implementation of the regional IARC Caribbean Cancer Registry Hub, and the creation of a framework for supporting comprehensive cancer research programs in Africa. Dr. Martin also served as scientific officer for the Global Environmental and Occupational Health (GEOHealth) and the Human, Health and Hereditary in Africa (H3Africa) programs; as well as programmatic advisor for several international cancer epidemiology consortia in low- and middle-income countries in the Caribbean and Africa. Dr. Martin obtained her Ph.D. (2004) in Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics at the University of Maryland in College Park and her MPH (2005) in Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

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Apply lessons learned about justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion in healthcare from 2020 for graduate students and early career professionals
Date: September 23, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Kimlin Ashing, PhD; Dante Morehead, MPH; Apoorva Reddy, and Adati Tarfa
Moderators: Kassandra Alcaraz, PhD, MPH; Megan Shen, PhD; and Jean C.Yi, PhD

       

The year 2020 awakened the need to examine justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion in our healthcare system and research programs. The scholars in this webinar are from diverse backgrounds and will be sharing their experiences and lessons learned and providing tips on how the audience can turn the lessons from 2020 into actionable initiatives in their research, advocacy, and training programs.

Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing, Ph.D is Professor Beckman Research Institute, Associate Director of the Division of Health Equities and Founding Director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education, City of Hope Medical Center.  As an advocate-population scientist, she is working closely with multiethnic, BIPOC, and multisectoral partners to develop and implement evidenced based, culturally, clinically and community responsive health improvement studies and interventions. Her mission is to conduct multidisciplinary, translational research while engaging advocates and civil society in science to speed-up and ensure the public benefit of biomedical research and advancements. She holds several national leadership roles within the American Association for Cancer Researchers. She is a leader within the NIH-funded African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium where she co-chairs the Women’s Cancers Working-Group; Society of Behavioral Medicine, Cancer Special Interest Group-Health Equity; CancerCare Patient Values Initiative_Patient Values Working-Group; ASCO-Depression and Anxiety Expert Panel. She is a Life member of Association of Black Psychologists. She is a notable leader in examining health disparities, cancer inequities and survivorship. She has published over 100 articles and book chapters.  In 2017, she coauthored Detecting and Living with Breast Cancer: for Dummies, Wiley, NY. She thrives on faith, family, science to society, and organic gardening.

Dante Morehead, MPH, is the community health educator/researcher for African American/African descent populations with the Office of Community Outreach & Engagement at Fred Hutch/Univ. of Washington Cancer Consortium. His work focuses on outreach, engagement, education & community-based participatory research with communities and underserved populations in the western Washington catchment area. He works with patients, researchers, physicians, community advocates, and CBOs to address systemic inequities in cancer prevention and care. His own journey with that of a rare, genetic disease and his own journey through chemotherapy drives his passion for public health and research.

As a PhD student at UW-Madison, Apoorva Reddy is currently testing a technology-based pharmacy intervention and conducting clinical research to test the efficacy of CBD oil. She earned a Master's of Science degree in Health Services Research in Pharmacy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. As a TL1 Fellow with the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, she also completed the certificate in fundamentals of clinical research. Apoorva earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Neuroscience and minor in Spanish Studies from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.
Apoorva is President of the Global Health, One Health Interest Group based in the UW School of Medicine and Public Health. She serves on the student subcommittee for the UW Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education. Her goal is to improve diversity and collaborative training approaches across health professions.

Adati Tarfa is a pharmacist and third-year Ph.D. student in Health Services Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy. Adati’s doctoral research examines the barriers to retaining people living with HIV in care utilizing stakeholder perspectives. Her goal is to promote collaborative practices between social workers and pharmacists to improve HIV care in communities. Additionally, Adati is involved in self-directed learning to understand justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion in teaching, research, and pharmacy practice. She works as the graduate assistant to the Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives at her institution to implement best practices in creating an equitable environment for graduate students, faculty, and staff. Adati currently serves as the Student Liaison of the Health Equity SIG.

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Alternatives to academic careers for behavioral scientists
Date: September 30, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Stephanie Fitzpatrick, PhD; Megan Lewis, PhD; and Deb Glaser, EdD; and Morgan S. Lee, PhD, MPH ,CPH
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

       

Not everyone who trains in behavioral or social sciences may want to work in an academic setting. They may have grown out of it, found that the work isn’t what they thought it was, or that they would rather find a different way of contributing to the field. This panel discussion will bring together 4 behavioral and social scientists who work in non-academic settings. We will facilitate a discussion on each panelists career path, the type of work they do, and advice for those interested in or seeking careers outside of academia. The panelists represent unique positions and organizations and will provide a rich introduction to the various opportunities for those trained in behavioral medicine.

Stephanie Fitzpatrick, PhD, is a clinical health psychologist whose research focuses on embedding behavioral interventions for obesity and chronic disease management in primary care practices. She has expertise in development, implementation, and analysis of behavioral interventions, including use of advanced statistical modeling including structural equation modeling and item response theory.
After earning her PhD in clinical psychology with a specialization in health psychology from the University of Miami, Dr. Fitzpatrick completed a one-year health psychology internship in the Department of Behavioral Sciences at Rush University Medical Center and a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Before joining CHR, Dr. Fitzpatrick was an assistant professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Rush University Medical Center from 2013-2016. She is currently the Senior Manager of the Multicultural Program with WW (formally known as Weight Watchers).

Megan A. Lewis, PhD, applies her unique expertise in health-related interpersonal communication to conduct complex program evaluations and advance the fields of health promotion and disease management. Her work spans a range of health topics, including physical activity, nutrition, cancer prevention, HIV, Type 1 and 2 diabetes, arthritis, and chronic disease management. For example, Dr. Lewis is directing the development of an interactive computer-based tool that will deliver highly tailored prevention messages to people living with HIV during their primary care clinic appointments. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the tool will also generate feedback to patients and their health care providers to support their communication around adherence, retention in care, and sexual risk reduction. Dr. Lewis earned her MA and PhD in Social Ecology at the University of California at Irvine.

Deb is passionate about applying behavioral science with innovative technology to create learning experiences to supercharge leaders. She’s a Learning Experience Designer at Google focused on innovative ways to build coaching and sales capabilities. Prior to Google, Deb worked in digital health and education at startups including Altschool and Carrot Inc. building programs to support behavior change through motivation science, education, and technology.
Before pivoting to industry, Deb spent 7 years as a Professor of Health and Behavior at The City University of New York. She earned a Doctorate in Health and Behavioral Studies with a concentration in Health Psychology and K-12 Health Education from Columbia University. She is a Certified Health and Wellness Coach and a Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES).

Morgan S. Lee, PhD, MPH, CPH is the head of behavioral science/research at Mainstay (formerly AdmitHub). Dr. Lee started her career in academia and was a tenure track faculty member at the University of Colorado. She was a behavioral science consultant for several years before leaving academia and has worked as a senior research scientist at CommunicateHealth, Inc. and as a senior behavioral scientist at Helm. She is a skilled communicator passionate about translating complex concepts into actionable insights and producing engaging deliverables. Dr. Lee has experience with a wide variety of quantitative and qualitative research and evaluation methods, and she loves using behavioral science to solve complex problems.

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Webinar Recordings


 

How to Communicate Your Science to The Public: Infographics
Date: June 17, 2021

Have you heard about infographics, but you aren’t quite sure what they are? Have you ever thought about using infographics to communicate your science, but you weren’t quite sure where to start? Through an engaging panel discussion, this webinar will provide an overview of the process of developing infographics to communicate your science effectively. Experts will share their experiences as well as tips, resources, and lessons learned to help you effectively communicate your science to a broader public through infographics. And those new to the process will share their experiences in beginning to undertake this form of science communication.



 

How to Communicate Your Science to The Public: Health Policy Briefs and Position Statements
Date: June 10, 2021

Have you heard about health policy briefs/position statements, but you aren’t quite sure what they are? Have you ever thought about writing a health policy brief/position statement, but you weren’t sure how to get started? Through an engaging panel discussion, this webinar will provide an overview of the process of writing health policy briefs/position statements. Experts will share their experiences as well as tips, resources, and lessons learned to help you effectively communicate your science to policy makers. In addition, those newer to the process will share their experiences in beginning to undertake this form of writing, including a discussion of potential challenges and how to overcome them.



 

Diversifying The Investigator Workforce
Date: June 03, 2021

Brief panel discussion of recent research of NIH funding that have showed disparities in funding of minority researchers, disparities in funding for research with minority populations, etc. The second part of the webinar would be to discuss ideas for policies or actions for change. Webinar sponsored by the Women’s Health and Health Equity SIGs.



 

How to Communicate Your Science to the Public: Op-Eds
Date: May 27, 2021

Have you heard about op-eds, but you aren’t quite sure what they are? Have you ever thought about writing an op-ed, but you weren’t quite sure where to start? Through an engaging panel discussion, this webinar will provide an overview of the process of writing an op-ed for various publication outlets. Experts will share their experiences as well as tips, resources, and lessons learned to help you effectively communicate your science to a broader public through op-eds. And those new to the process will share their experiences in beginning to undertake this form of writing.



 

How to Land Your First R01(s)
Date: May 6, 2021

This webinar will feature three speakers who recently landed their first R01s sharing their success stories: (1) Two  R01s simultaneously, (2) R01s on first submission, and (3) R37 MERIT Award for outstanding impact score of 10.



 

Developing and testing technology enhanced mind-body and lifestyle interventions
Date: April 29, 2021

This webinar will discuss novel methodological and practical strategies for developing, optimizing, and testing technology enhanced mind-body and lifestyle interventions for medical patients and their families.  It will highlight the importance of nurturing interdisciplinary collaborations between clinicians and researchers as building blocks for this research, as well as underscore opportunities for engaging and supporting trainees toward developing their own research careers. Strategies for securing funding for each step of the research project will also be discussed.



 

Increasing Accessibility and Inclusion in Your Science Communication
Date: March 25, 2021

Communicating your science effectively is an important task for researchers. It is critical to ensure that your science communication is accessible to a wide audience. Attendees will hear from two experts on accessibility and inclusion considerations when 1) preparing scientific presentations, 2) when communicating their science in virtual spaces (e.g., social media), and 3) when communicating science more broadly (e.g., on a lab website or in a press release). Questions are encouraged and will be discussed during of the webinar.



 

Training Opportunities in Behavioral Research within the National Cancer Institute
Date: March 18, 2021

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is the largest institute within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the one that leads the nation’s cancer research program. One of the critical goals of the NCI is to train the next generation of cancer researchers, and each year NCI trains approximately 3,500 fellows.  Cancer-related training opportunities are especially critical for those engaged in behavioral research given the vital role of behavior in reducing cancer burden for the public along the entire cancer continuum, from prevention to end-of-life.  This presentation will first provide a brief overview of NIH and NCI and then focus on a training program offered within the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS).  DCCPS offers a multi-disciplinary research training program including concentrations in behavioral, epidemiological, surveillance, and health care-related topics. This training program accepts trainees from a wide range of educational backgrounds ranging from high school students up to and including those with doctoral-level degrees (e.g., PhD; MD).  Next, the presentation will provide an overview of current training opportunities and mechanisms offered in DCCPS, including the Cancer Research Training Award program, the Cancer Prevention Fellowship and NCI Communications Fellowship.  This discussion will include the degree requirements, application process, and fellowship focus.  Following this overview, a post-doctoral (PhD) fellow will discuss her educational and training backgrounds, share how she obtained her fellowship, describe her research interests and current projects, discuss professional training and leadership development opportunities available for fellows, and provide helpful advice for those interested in obtaining a DCCPS fellowship.  Following the presentation, time will be allotted for attendees to ask questions of the presenters and to learn more about the myriad fellowship opportunities within DCCPS.



 

Building a Race- and Ethnicity-sensitive Physical Activity Research Program
Date: March 4, 2021

This webinar will feature three researchers who have built careers based on incorporating and studying race, ethnicity, and health equity in the context of physical activity. They will each describe how they built their research (and practice) programs, how and why they have focused on race/ethnicity in their work, challenges they have faced along the way, how they encourage equity and inclusion on their own research teams, and tips for researchers to build their own race- and ethnicity-sensitive physical activity and health equity research programs.



 

Choosing the right research design in the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST)
Date: February 25 2021

The Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) is a framework for designing and testing intervention packages. While the strategy is most often associated with the factorial trial design to test intervention components, there are many research designs that are encompassed within the framework. This webinar will provide a brief overview of MOST and then address how best to identify the phase and design to use based on the state of the science and open scientific questions Drs. Angela Pfammatter and Ahnalee Brincks will provide insight into design selection by highlighting the contrast between the factorial randomized trial and Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial (SMART). The webinar will provide an opportunity to ask questions about phase and design selection.



 

Why would we ever go back? “Re-zooming” our research during the COVID-19 era
Date: February 24, 2021

This 1-hour webinar will offer practical, fresh, and innovative strategies for conducting social/behavioral and health services research remotely – from recruiting participants to collecting data and conducting interventions. The presenters will draw on several years of virtual study experience to address lessons learned for engaging and supporting remote study participants and enhancing remote study quality. We also will discuss specific tips for supporting research staff and other team members in maintaining stamina and quality-of-life at work when conducting most or all study tasks remotely.



 

Advancing the science of behavior change through rigorous meta-reviews
Date: February 18, 2021

Meta-reviews, i.e., reviews of reviews, are of growing popularity as scholars strive to make sense of disparate research findings and determine what conclusions about a phenomenon are most trustworthy. In 2017, we initiated a project focused on examining mechanisms of health behavior change interventions in chronic disease prevention and treatment. This project resulted in a meta-review of 66 meta-analyses that examined aspects related to this research question as well as an entire special issue of “sub” meta-reviews that took a domain focused approach to the broader question. While the substantive findings of the meta-review(s) can be found in Health Psychology Review (Vol 14, Issue 1, Pages 1-212, 2020), there are many methodological aspects of the project important to furthering a science of behavior change that are not detailed in any of the published reports. In this presentation, we will address best-practice standards for meta-reviews including novel approaches we found or developed while conducting several meta-reviews, including both qualitative and quantitative aspects. We will also address practical issues (e.g., resources required; feasibility). We believe that well-conducted meta-reviews increase efficiency, and in identifying “what works” best, they ultimately improve science, practice, and policy.



 

Tips for Presenting Your Science at the 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting
Date: February 11, 2021

This webinar will review the presentation formats for the 2021 virtual annual meeting and provide tips on how to effectively communicate science and practice in a virtual environment. We will specifically review the different presentation formats, requirements for pre-recorded and live sessions in the virtual platform, ways to enhance engagement virtually, improving accessibility of research talks and spotlights, and how to effectively communicate your science/practice in a 2-min research spotlight. 



 

Developing Good Academic Writing Practices
Date: February 4, 2021

We will discuss methods to develop good habits for academic writing, focusing on the many different ways one can accomplish this goal. Topics will include: reviewing common ways to develop and maintain a writing practice, assessing one’s current habits, and goal setting for new writing habits. There will be significant time to discuss what has and has not worked for attendees in the past and to plan for the future. We will provide attendees with a list for further readings.



 

Tips & Tricks for Virtual Networking and Presentations by the IPC SIG
Date: January 28, 2021

Attendees will hear from three experts on how to interact in the virtual environment. Experts will provide keys to success for initiating and fostering remote relationships. We will also promote discussion on increasing engagement, focus, and collaboration. We will also focus on unique barriers trainees and early career professionals have in these situations.



 

Innovative cancer interventions across the developmental spectrum
Date: January 21, 2021

This webinar is meant to highlight current cancer research being done with pediatric, teenage, and young adult populations. The presenters intend to highlight innovativeness of interventions in their current research, including intervention environment (oncology camp), self-management, and peer-support models.



 

Transitioning to Early-Career, students
Date: January 14, 2021

After many years of graduate school, transitioning to early career not always intuitive or a linear journey, leaving some unsure of what their next steps should be. This webinar will provide perspectives and lessons learned from behavioral scientists with expertise in transitioning from graduate school to early career work in academia and industry.  Presenters include Nazanin Heydarian, Ph.D. (PODER program manager and consultant), Alyssa Vela, Ph.D. (clinician and researcher) and Allyson Hughes, Ph.D. (a nonprofit based researcher and consultant). The presentation will be moderated by Yessenia Castro, Ph.D. Topics will include how to choose your specific career path, being the expert in the room, choosing a post-doc, consulting, networking, and prioritizing your goals. The webinar will feature an extended Q & A session for open discussion geared towards students and trainees.



 

Nation-wide Dissemination of a Public Health Approach to Suicide Prevention
Date: December 10, 2020

Service members and Veterans (SMVs) face the highest risk of suicide during their first year after exiting military service. Reintegration difficulties have been shown to contribute to this risk. To assist, Expiration Term of Service (ETS) Sponsorship was developed as a public health approach to suicide prevention for SMVs and connects SMVs to certified sponsors and community services in their post-military hometowns. This program is non-stigmatizing as it is aligned with military culture and is similar to sponsorship programs that all SMVs use when transitioning from one military installation to another.



 

Career Paths Beyond the Academic Track
Date: November 12, 2020

There are many exciting career paths for behavior scientists to apply their expertise, but trainees often do not get exposed to non-academic career positions in their academic training settings. This webinar will showcase three SBM members who are working in non-traditional settings. Attendees will learn where to find these positions; what the job search and interview process is like; the pros and cons of careers outside of academia; and get words of wisdom from SBM members who have had career success outside academia