Webinars

Developing and testing technology enhanced mind-body and lifestyle interventions
Date: April 29, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Ana-Maria Vranceanu, PhD
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

This webinar will discuss novel methodological and practical strategies for developing, optimizing, and testing technology enhanced mind-body and lifestyle interventions for medical patients and their families.  It will highlight the importance of nurturing interdisciplinary collaborations between clinicians and researchers as building blocks for this research, as well as underscore opportunities for engaging and supporting trainees toward developing their own research careers. Strategies for securing funding for each step of the research project will also be discussed.

Ana-Maria Vranceanu is a clinical health psychologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)and an Associate Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. She is the founding director of the Integrated Brain Health Clinical and Research Program, Director of the Brain Health track of the MGH Internship in Clinical Psychology, and Co-director of Grants Consultations and Support within the Department of Psychiatry at MGH.  Her research is focused on developing and testing technology enhanced mind-body and lifestyle interventions for medical patients and families.  She has been PI on over 20 foundation and federal grants and has published over 160 articles. She has a particular interest in mentoring junior investigators and is leading a K23 mentoring group at MGH.

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How to Land Your First R01(s)
Date: May 6, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Tiffany Carson, PhD, MPH; Candyce Kroenke, ScD, MPH; and Megan Shen, PhD
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

   

This webinar will feature three speakers who recently landed their first R01s sharing their success stories: (1) Two  R01s simultaneously, (2) R01s on first submission, and (3) R37 MERIT Award for outstanding impact score of 10.

Dr. Carson is an Associate Member in the Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior in the Division of Population Sciences at Moffitt Cancer Center. As an applied epidemiologist, Dr. Carson has a breadth of research experience with a central theme of population-based, bio-behavioral observational and intervention studies for obesity treatment and cancer prevention. Dr. Carson is currently the PI of 2 NIH-funded R01 studies investigating behavioral and biological aspects of weight management, cancer prevention, and health disparities. Dr. Carson has published in multiple peer-reviewed journals including Obesity, Psychosomatic Medicine, and JAMA. In addition to her research portfolio, Dr. Carson has nearly a decade of experience mentoring early stage scientists. Twitter handle: @DrTiffanyCarson

Candyce Kroenke, MPH, ScD, is a research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research (DOR). Dr. Kroenke's research focuses on understanding relationships between social determinants of health, particularly social isolation and social support, and cancer survival. She is currently the principal investigator of three studies funded by the National Cancer Institute examining the role of social networks in breast cancer treatment, lifestyle behaviors, and prognosis. Her team is also developing an electronic health record-based tool to identify breast cancer patients at risk of low social support. She is also the principal investigator of a study funded by the American Cancer Society examining the role of social networks in racial disparities in breast cancer treatment and survival. Dr. Kroenke received her doctorate in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health and her master's and undergraduate degrees in Epidemiology and Sociology from the University of Minnesota. Prior to her work at the Division of Research, she was an instructor at the Harvard Medical School and a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at the University of California.
Twitter handle: @ckroenkescd

Megan J Shen, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychology in Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, housed within Cornell’s Center for Research on End-of-Life Care. Her research focuses on developing social psychological and communication-based interventions designed to improve engagement in advance care planning and end-of-life care communication and care outcomes among patients with advanced illness. Much of her work seeks to reduce disparities in end-of-life care communication and care outcomes among minority patients, including Latino advanced cancer patients. She is the recipient of an NCI K07 Career Award, R21, R03, and R37 MERIT award as well as an American Cancer Society Award. She is also a selected Research Scholar of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and was selected as a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) Research Institute participant. Dr. Shen is devoted to increasing awareness about end-of-life care issues and health disparities among the broader public. To this end, she has published policy statements as well as serves as a regular contributor to Harvard’s Petrie-Flom blog, “Bill of Health” where she has covered issues including addressing equitable end-of-life care for underserved populations, equitable COVID-19 vaccine rollout, and the need for diversity and inclusion in medical education.
Twitter handle: @meganjshenphd

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Getting optimization work funded in your career stage
Date: May 13, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Kate Guastaferro, PhD, MPH and Heather Wasser, PhD, MPH, RD
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

 

The multiphase optimization strategy (MOST) is an engineering-inspired framework for developing, optimizing, and evaluating behavioral and biobehavioral interventions. The number of publications and funded research projects utilizing the MOST framework have grown dramatically since the first publication describing MOST in 2005. Yet, despite the increased awareness and interest in MOST among behavioral researchers, many practical questions remain, the least of which is: where do I start and how do I get funded? In this webinar, Drs. Kate Guastaferro and Heather Wasser will provide a brief overview of the MOST framework and highlight currently funded research projects spanning the three phases of the framework (preparation, optimization, and evaluation) at multiple career stages. Examples will encompass a variety of funding mechanisms (NIH F, K, R, and U awards as well as foundation grants), behavioral foci (palliative care, substance use, obesity prevention), and methodological approaches (experimental designs, multiple outcomes, implementation outcomes).

Kate Guastaferro is an assistant research professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State. She has a doctorate and masters of public health with a focus on prevention science. Kate completed a T32 postdoctoral fellowship in the Prevention and Methodology Training program at Penn State with advanced training centered substantively upon the prevention of child sexual abuse and methodologically on innovative methods for the optimization, evaluation, and dissemination of interventions (e.g., the multiphase optimization strategy [MOST]) with high public health impact. She was the recipient of the 2020 Victoria S. Levin Award for Early Career Success in Young Children’s Mental Health from the Society for Research on Child Development. Working at the cutting edge of prevention and intervention science, Dr. Guastaferro’s program of research is devoted to the development, optimization, and evaluation of effective, efficient, economical, and scalable interventions, specifically focusing on the prevention of child maltreatment.  

Dr. Wasser completed her PhD in Nutrition with a focus on behavioral interventions and her MPH in Nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She obtained her certification for dietetic registration and completed graduate coursework in community nutrition at Cornell University and obtained her BS in Dietetics at Fontbonne University. She is PI of a K01 award funded through NIDDK to conduct an optimization trial to test strategies for promoting healthy dietary intake among infants and Co-I on a R01 optimizing an mHealth just-in-time adaptive intervention for weight loss among young adults. Her research focuses on the design of behavioral interventions at the intersection of nutrition and child development, including the use of new technologies to improve caregiver and infant diet, and interventions promoting social support for caregivers during the first 1,000 days.
Twitter handle: @WasserHeather

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How to Communicate Your Science to the Public: Op-Eds
Date: May 27, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Carly Goldstein, PhD; Kate Hoerster, PhD; Megan Shen, PhD; and Monica Wang, ScD
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

     

Have you heard about op-eds, but you aren’t quite sure what they are? Have you ever thought about writing an op-ed, but you weren’t quite sure where to start? Through an engaging panel discussion, this webinar will provide an overview of the process of writing an op-ed for various publication outlets. Experts will share their experiences as well as tips, resources, and lessons learned to help you effectively communicate your science to a broader public through op-eds. And those new to the process will share their experiences in beginning to undertake this form of writing.

Dr. Carly M. Goldstein is an Assistant Professor (Research) in the Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a Research Scientist at the Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center of The Miriam Hospital. Her research is generously funded by the National Institutes of Health and focuses on cardiovascular disease prevention, secondary prevention, and intervention using technology and optimization methodologies. She is also the Chair of the Society of Behavioral Medicine's Civic and Public Engagement Committee, SBM's science communication group. CPEC's mission is to support members in communicating their science through op-eds, infographics, and speaking with the press. They support efforts to communicate science to patients, the lay public, community stakeholders, policy makers, and more.
Twitter handle: @sciCarly

Kate Hoerster, who uses she/her pronouns, is a licensed clinical psychologist. She was born, raised, and lives in Seattle, the unceded ancestral lands of the Duwamish people. She’s an investigator at the VA HSR&D Center of Innovation for Veteran-Centered and Value-Driven Care, and Assistant Professor in the University of Washington Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Kate is dedicated to supporting equity, choice, and resilience for people as they pursue health and well-being. She leads two large VA-funded trials focused on weight management and whole health, as well as several smaller studies focused on understanding and addressing social determinants of health. She has written several op-eds and letters to the editor to share behavioral medicine with the public and to affect policy. She prioritizes partnering with others and mentoring around writing for the public to elevate underrepresented voices and to affect pressing equity and policy issues affecting her home community.
Twitter handle: @KateHoerster

Megan J Shen, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychology in Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, housed within Cornell’s Center for Research on End-of-Life Care. Her research focuses on developing social psychological and communication-based interventions designed to improve engagement in advance care planning and end-of-life care communication and care outcomes among patients with advanced illness. Much of her work seeks to reduce disparities in end-of-life care communication and care outcomes among minority patients, including Latino advanced cancer patients. She is the recipient of an NCI K07 Career Award, R21, R03, and R37 MERIT award as well as an American Cancer Society Award. She is also a selected Research Scholar of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and was selected as a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) Research Institute participant. Dr. Shen is devoted to increasing awareness about end-of-life care issues and health disparities among the broader public. To this end, she has published policy statements as well as serves as a regular contributor to Harvard’s Petrie-Flom blog, “Bill of Health” where she has covered issues including addressing equitable end-of-life care for underserved populations, equitable COVID-19 vaccine rollout, and the need for diversity and inclusion in medical education.
Twitter handle: @meganjshenphd

Monica L. Wang is an Associate Professor at the Boston University (BU) School of Public Health, an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and the Associate Director of Narrative at the BU Center for Antiracist Research. She is a nationally recognized expert in health equity and has received numerous awards for her research, teaching, and service, including the national Society of Behavioral Medicine Early Career Investigator Award. She is a founding editorial member of The Emancipator, a media platform partnership between the Boston Globe and the Bu Center for Antiracist Research that will reframe the national conversation on race and racial justice.
Twitter handle: @DrMonicaWang

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Diversifying the investigator workforce
Date: June 3, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Mercedes Carnethon, PhD; Tiffany Carson, PhD, MPH; and Veronica P.S. Njie-Carr, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, FWACN  
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

   

Brief panel discussion of recent research of NIH funding that have showed disparities in funding of minority researchers, disparities in funding for research with minority populations, etc. The second part of the webinar would be to discuss ideas for policies or actions for change. Webinar sponsored by the Women’s Health and Health Equity SIGs.

Mercedes Carnethon, PhD, Mary Harris Thompson Professor and Vice Chair of Preventive Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)
Dr. Carnethon is an epidemiologist whose research focuses on the distribution and determinants of chronic diseases, specifically cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and lung disease. She and her team have described the burden of these conditions in population subgroups defined by race, ethnicity, geography, sexual orientation/gender identity and socioeconomic position. With funding from the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association and the American Lung Association, Dr. Carnethon and her team have described the contribution of health behaviors such as sleep, physical activity and diet play on the development and outcomes from chronic diseases. Over her 20 year career, she has authored over 300 publications that appear in leading scientific journals in the fields of medicine and public health.  Within her institution, Dr. Carnethon serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Education and Career Development and the Associate Chair of the Appointments, Promotion and Tenure Committee.  In recognition for her role a leader in postdoctoral training and early career mentoring, Dr. Carnethon earned the Mentor of the Year Award in 2018.  Dr. Carnethon is an active volunteer of the American Heart Association where she serves as a board member for the Chicago chapter.  Her research findings have been disseminated broadly through major print (e.g., Chicago Tribune, USA Today, New York Times), local and national media.

Dr. Carson is an Associate Member in the Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior in the Division of Population Sciences at Moffitt Cancer Center. As an applied epidemiologist, Dr. Carson has a breadth of research experience with a central theme of population-based, bio-behavioral observational and intervention studies for obesity treatment and cancer prevention. Dr. Carson is currently the PI of 2 NIH-funded R01 studies investigating behavioral and biological aspects of weight management, cancer prevention, and health disparities. Dr. Carson has published in multiple peer-reviewed journals including Obesity, Psychosomatic Medicine, and JAMA. In addition to her research portfolio, Dr. Carson has nearly a decade of experience mentoring early stage scientists. Twitter handle: @DrTiffanyCarson

Dr. Veronica Njie-Carr is a nurse researcher and an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Mary­land, Baltimore (https://www.nursing.umaryland.edu/directory/veronica-njie-carr/, with 35 years of nursing experience. Her work in academia spans over 25 years in universities and colleges in the Baltimore-Washington area in the United States including the University of Delaware, Howard University, and Johns Hopkins University. She is passionate and committed to contribute to finding solutions to eliminate health, global, and related dispar­ities, including disparities in the academy (http://bookstore.dorrancepublishing.com/disparities-in-the-academy/ ).  Dr. Njie-Carr’s teaching, scholar­ship, and program of research has evolved over the years to reflect the changing trends in HIV prevention and care, and the needs of marginalized people. Her most recent funded research studies include 1) leveraging tech­nology to addressing the needs of aging women with HIV infection, and 2) investigating the experiences of immigrant and refugee women survivors of violence. Dr. Njie-Carr is also engaged in teaching, mentoring, and supervising master’s nursing students at the University of the Gambia where she serves as a consultant on curricula and research related activities. She contributes to building faculty and nurse leadership capacity in The Gambia through collaborative initiatives with academic nursing faculty and the nursing practice leadership. Dr. Njie-Carr has served on national and international organizations and is a Fellow of the West African College of Nursing. Dr. Njie-Carr received a nursing diploma from The Gambia College in The Gambia; a baccalaureate degree in nursing from Howard Uni­versity; a master’s in nursing education and adult health, and PhD in nursing science from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. In addition, she received a postdoctoral fellowship training from Johns Hop­kins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

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How to Communicate Your Science to the Public: Health Policy Briefs and Position Statements
Date: June 10, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Akilah Dulin; Sarah Miller; and Megan Shen
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

   

Have you heard about health policy briefs/position statements, but you aren’t quite sure what they are? Have you ever thought about writing a health policy brief/position statement, but you weren’t sure how to get started? Through an engaging panel discussion, this webinar will provide an overview of the process of writing health policy briefs/position statements. Experts will share their experiences as well as tips, resources, and lessons learned to help you effectively communicate your science to policy makers. In addition, those newer to the process will share their experiences in beginning to undertake this form of writing, including a discussion of potential challenges and how to overcome them.

Dr. Akilah Dulin is the Chair of SBM’s Health Policy Committee. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences in the Brown University School of Public Health. Within the school, she is affiliated with the Center for Health Promotion and Health Equity.

Dr. Sarah J. Miller is an Assistant Professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and she has a dual appointment in the Department of Population Health Science and Policy and the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health.  She is actively involved in the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s Health Policy Committee and is committed to proposing and supporting policy changes that promote health equity. She is a licensed clinical psychologist and a health equity researcher. Her research focuses identifying barriers to cancer screening uptake and developing interventions to overcome those barriers. She is currently spearheading research initiatives that are centered on developing and testing digital health solutions designed to increase cancer screening uptake among medically underserved and socioeconomically disadvantaged patient populations. Her research has been supported by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Aging, and the American Cancer Society.  
Twitter handle: @SarahMillerPsyD

Megan Shen Bio: Megan J Shen, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychology in Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, housed within Cornell’s Center for Research on End-of-Life Care. Her research focuses on developing social psychological and communication-based interventions designed to improve engagement in advance care planning and end-of-life care communication and care outcomes among patients with advanced illness. Much of her work seeks to reduce disparities in end-of-life care communication and care outcomes among minority patients, including Latino advanced cancer patients. She is the recipient of an NCI K07 Career Award, R21, R03, and R37 MERIT award as well as an American Cancer Society Award. She is also a selected Research Scholar of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and was selected as a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) Research Institute participant. Dr. Shen is devoted to increasing awareness about end-of-life care issues and health disparities among the broader public. To this end, she has published policy statements as well as serves as a regular contributor to Harvard’s Petrie-Flom blog, “Bill of Health” where she has covered issues including addressing equitable end-of-life care for underserved populations, equitable COVID-19 vaccine rollout, and the need for diversity and inclusion in medical education.
Twitter handle: @meganjshenphd

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How to Communicate Your Science to the Public: Infographics
Date: June 17, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Rebecca Krukowski, PhD and Jaclyn P. Maher, PhD
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

 

Have you heard about infographics, but you aren’t quite sure what they are? Have you ever thought about using infographics to communicate your science, but you weren’t quite sure where to start? Through an engaging panel discussion, this webinar will provide an overview of the process of developing infographics to communicate your science effectively. Experts will share their experiences as well as tips, resources, and lessons learned to help you effectively communicate your science to a broader public through infographics. And those new to the process will share their experiences in beginning to undertake this form of science communication.

Becca Krukowski: I am a clinical psychologist and an Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. My research focuses on using digital health technologies to meet the needs of populations who do not have currently access to effective treatments, with a particular focus on behavioral weight management interventions and self-monitoring behaviors.

Dr. Jaclyn Maher is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Her research investigates the psychological antecedents and consequences of physical activity and sedentary behavior using real-time data capture methodology including ecological momentary assessment. Dr. Maher is the PI of a R15 from the NIA designed to examine motivational differences between physical activity adopters and physical activity maintainers using smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment and accelerometers. Dr. Maher is a member of SBM's Civic and Public Engagement Committee.
Twitter handle: @jaclynpmaher

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Alternatives to academic careers for behavioral scientists
Date: September 30, 2021
Time: 1 p.m. ET
Presenters: Stephanie Fitzpatrick, PhD; Megan Lewis, PhD; and Deb Glaser, EdD
Cost: Registration is free for SBM members and $45 non-members

     

Not everyone who trains in behavioral or social sciences may want to work in an academic setting. They may have grown out of it, found that the work isn’t what they thought it was, or that they would rather find a different way of contributing to the field. This panel discussion will bring together 4 behavioral and social scientists who work in non-academic settings. We will facilitate a discussion on each panelists career path, the type of work they do, and advice for those interested in or seeking careers outside of academia. The panelists represent unique positions and organizations and will provide a rich introduction to the various opportunities for those trained in behavioral medicine.

Stephanie Fitzpatrick, PhD, is a clinical health psychologist whose research focuses on embedding behavioral interventions for obesity and chronic disease management in primary care practices. She has expertise in development, implementation, and analysis of behavioral interventions, including use of advanced statistical modeling including structural equation modeling and item response theory.
After earning her PhD in clinical psychology with a specialization in health psychology from the University of Miami, Dr. Fitzpatrick completed a one-year health psychology internship in the Department of Behavioral Sciences at Rush University Medical Center and a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Before joining CHR, Dr. Fitzpatrick was an assistant professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Rush University Medical Center from 2013-2016.

Megan A. Lewis, PhD, applies her unique expertise in health-related interpersonal communication to conduct complex program evaluations and advance the fields of health promotion and disease management. Her work spans a range of health topics, including physical activity, nutrition, cancer prevention, HIV, Type 1 and 2 diabetes, arthritis, and chronic disease management. For example, Dr. Lewis is directing the development of an interactive computer-based tool that will deliver highly tailored prevention messages to people living with HIV during their primary care clinic appointments. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the tool will also generate feedback to patients and their health care providers to support their communication around adherence, retention in care, and sexual risk reduction. Dr. Lewis earned her MA and PhD in Social Ecology at the University of California at Irvine.

Deb is passionate about applying behavioral science with innovative technology to create learning experiences to supercharge leaders. She’s a Learning Experience Designer at Google focused on innovative ways to build coaching and sales capabilities. Prior to Google, Deb worked in digital health and education at startups including Altschool and Carrot Inc. building programs to support behavior change through motivation science, education, and technology.
Before pivoting to industry, Deb spent 7 years as a Professor of Health and Behavior at The City University of New York. She earned a Doctorate in Health and Behavioral Studies with a concentration in Health Psychology and K-12 Health Education from Columbia University. She is a Certified Health and Wellness Coach and a Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES).

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Webinar Recordings


 

Increasing Accessibility and Inclusion in Your Science Communication
Date: March 25, 2021

Communicating your science effectively is an important task for researchers. It is critical to ensure that your science communication is accessible to a wide audience. Attendees will hear from two experts on accessibility and inclusion considerations when 1) preparing scientific presentations, 2) when communicating their science in virtual spaces (e.g., social media), and 3) when communicating science more broadly (e.g., on a lab website or in a press release). Questions are encouraged and will be discussed during of the webinar.



 

Training Opportunities in Behavioral Research within the National Cancer Institute
Date: March 18, 2021

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is the largest institute within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the one that leads the nation’s cancer research program. One of the critical goals of the NCI is to train the next generation of cancer researchers, and each year NCI trains approximately 3,500 fellows.  Cancer-related training opportunities are especially critical for those engaged in behavioral research given the vital role of behavior in reducing cancer burden for the public along the entire cancer continuum, from prevention to end-of-life.  This presentation will first provide a brief overview of NIH and NCI and then focus on a training program offered within the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS).  DCCPS offers a multi-disciplinary research training program including concentrations in behavioral, epidemiological, surveillance, and health care-related topics. This training program accepts trainees from a wide range of educational backgrounds ranging from high school students up to and including those with doctoral-level degrees (e.g., PhD; MD).  Next, the presentation will provide an overview of current training opportunities and mechanisms offered in DCCPS, including the Cancer Research Training Award program, the Cancer Prevention Fellowship and NCI Communications Fellowship.  This discussion will include the degree requirements, application process, and fellowship focus.  Following this overview, a post-doctoral (PhD) fellow will discuss her educational and training backgrounds, share how she obtained her fellowship, describe her research interests and current projects, discuss professional training and leadership development opportunities available for fellows, and provide helpful advice for those interested in obtaining a DCCPS fellowship.  Following the presentation, time will be allotted for attendees to ask questions of the presenters and to learn more about the myriad fellowship opportunities within DCCPS.



 

Building a Race- and Ethnicity-sensitive Physical Activity Research Program
Date: March 4, 2021

This webinar will feature three researchers who have built careers based on incorporating and studying race, ethnicity, and health equity in the context of physical activity. They will each describe how they built their research (and practice) programs, how and why they have focused on race/ethnicity in their work, challenges they have faced along the way, how they encourage equity and inclusion on their own research teams, and tips for researchers to build their own race- and ethnicity-sensitive physical activity and health equity research programs.



 

Choosing the right research design in the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST)
Date: February 25 2021

The Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) is a framework for designing and testing intervention packages. While the strategy is most often associated with the factorial trial design to test intervention components, there are many research designs that are encompassed within the framework. This webinar will provide a brief overview of MOST and then address how best to identify the phase and design to use based on the state of the science and open scientific questions Drs. Angela Pfammatter and Ahnalee Brincks will provide insight into design selection by highlighting the contrast between the factorial randomized trial and Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial (SMART). The webinar will provide an opportunity to ask questions about phase and design selection.



 

Why would we ever go back? “Re-zooming” our research during the COVID-19 era
Date: February 24, 2021

This 1-hour webinar will offer practical, fresh, and innovative strategies for conducting social/behavioral and health services research remotely – from recruiting participants to collecting data and conducting interventions. The presenters will draw on several years of virtual study experience to address lessons learned for engaging and supporting remote study participants and enhancing remote study quality. We also will discuss specific tips for supporting research staff and other team members in maintaining stamina and quality-of-life at work when conducting most or all study tasks remotely.



 

Advancing the science of behavior change through rigorous meta-reviews
Date: February 18, 2021

Meta-reviews, i.e., reviews of reviews, are of growing popularity as scholars strive to make sense of disparate research findings and determine what conclusions about a phenomenon are most trustworthy. In 2017, we initiated a project focused on examining mechanisms of health behavior change interventions in chronic disease prevention and treatment. This project resulted in a meta-review of 66 meta-analyses that examined aspects related to this research question as well as an entire special issue of “sub” meta-reviews that took a domain focused approach to the broader question. While the substantive findings of the meta-review(s) can be found in Health Psychology Review (Vol 14, Issue 1, Pages 1-212, 2020), there are many methodological aspects of the project important to furthering a science of behavior change that are not detailed in any of the published reports. In this presentation, we will address best-practice standards for meta-reviews including novel approaches we found or developed while conducting several meta-reviews, including both qualitative and quantitative aspects. We will also address practical issues (e.g., resources required; feasibility). We believe that well-conducted meta-reviews increase efficiency, and in identifying “what works” best, they ultimately improve science, practice, and policy.



 

Tips for Presenting Your Science at the 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting
Date: February 11, 2021

This webinar will review the presentation formats for the 2021 virtual annual meeting and provide tips on how to effectively communicate science and practice in a virtual environment. We will specifically review the different presentation formats, requirements for pre-recorded and live sessions in the virtual platform, ways to enhance engagement virtually, improving accessibility of research talks and spotlights, and how to effectively communicate your science/practice in a 2-min research spotlight. 



 

Developing Good Academic Writing Practices
Date: February 4, 2021

We will discuss methods to develop good habits for academic writing, focusing on the many different ways one can accomplish this goal. Topics will include: reviewing common ways to develop and maintain a writing practice, assessing one’s current habits, and goal setting for new writing habits. There will be significant time to discuss what has and has not worked for attendees in the past and to plan for the future. We will provide attendees with a list for further readings.



 

Tips & Tricks for Virtual Networking and Presentations by the IPC SIG
Date: January 28, 2021

Attendees will hear from three experts on how to interact in the virtual environment. Experts will provide keys to success for initiating and fostering remote relationships. We will also promote discussion on increasing engagement, focus, and collaboration. We will also focus on unique barriers trainees and early career professionals have in these situations.



 

Innovative cancer interventions across the developmental spectrum
Date: January 21, 2021

This webinar is meant to highlight current cancer research being done with pediatric, teenage, and young adult populations. The presenters intend to highlight innovativeness of interventions in their current research, including intervention environment (oncology camp), self-management, and peer-support models.



 

Transitioning to Early-Career, students
Date: January 14, 2021

After many years of graduate school, transitioning to early career not always intuitive or a linear journey, leaving some unsure of what their next steps should be. This webinar will provide perspectives and lessons learned from behavioral scientists with expertise in transitioning from graduate school to early career work in academia and industry.  Presenters include Nazanin Heydarian, Ph.D. (PODER program manager and consultant), Alyssa Vela, Ph.D. (clinician and researcher) and Allyson Hughes, Ph.D. (a nonprofit based researcher and consultant). The presentation will be moderated by Yessenia Castro, Ph.D. Topics will include how to choose your specific career path, being the expert in the room, choosing a post-doc, consulting, networking, and prioritizing your goals. The webinar will feature an extended Q & A session for open discussion geared towards students and trainees.



 

Nation-wide Dissemination of a Public Health Approach to Suicide Prevention
Date: December 10, 2020

Service members and Veterans (SMVs) face the highest risk of suicide during their first year after exiting military service. Reintegration difficulties have been shown to contribute to this risk. To assist, Expiration Term of Service (ETS) Sponsorship was developed as a public health approach to suicide prevention for SMVs and connects SMVs to certified sponsors and community services in their post-military hometowns. This program is non-stigmatizing as it is aligned with military culture and is similar to sponsorship programs that all SMVs use when transitioning from one military installation to another.



 

Career Paths Beyond the Academic Track
Date: November 12, 2020

There are many exciting career paths for behavior scientists to apply their expertise, but trainees often do not get exposed to non-academic career positions in their academic training settings. This webinar will showcase three SBM members who are working in non-traditional settings. Attendees will learn where to find these positions; what the job search and interview process is like; the pros and cons of careers outside of academia; and get words of wisdom from SBM members who have had career success outside academia



 

Clinical and Research Training Opportunities in Palliative Care
Date: November 5, 2020

Interdisciplinary clinicians and researchers in palliative care will serve as panelists to discuss activities related to clinical training, professional development, mentorship, and research. The group will then open-up the webinar for audience questions and answers.



 

Presenting Online Without being Boring
Date: October 1, 2020

The current COVID-19 situation led to a drastic change in the research and practical world. Conferences are now being hold via online conference tools, platforms, and pre-recorded sessions. Also, job interviews and presentations take place via conference tools, which requires unique presentation skills compared to in-person presentations. In this webinar, principles of effective communications will be applied to an online environment and creative implementation of highlighting and emphasizing different issues while engaging the audience will be presented. Strategies such as incorporating humor, juxtaposing arguments, and capitalizing on technology are examples of infusing energy into a presentation. In addition, the importance of a dynamic personality for an engaging online presence will be discussed.



 

Conducting Weight Management and Eating Disorder RCTs admist a Global Pandemic
Date: September 24, 2020

This webinar will focus on the logistics of conducting weight management and eating disorder treatment trials amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Panelists are researchers who are currently conducting clinical trials or who will be starting new clinical trials in the near future. The panel will discuss how to effectively 1) recruit participants  2) start/design a new RCT and 3) adjust a current RCT amidst a global pandemic. This webinar is a great opportunity for established and early career researchers who may need to adjust strategies for collecting data in the upcoming year to learn from researchers who have been successful in conducting RCTs amongst diverse patient populations.



 

Advancing Dual-Process Models of Health Behavior Using Intensive Longitudinal Data in the Era of COVID-19
Date: September 17, 2020

Long-term maintenance of behaviors such as exercise, healthy eating, and avoidance of tobacco and excessive alcohol is critical to reduce non-communicable disease burden. However, in the era of Covid-19, patterns of health behavior have been disrupted by social-distancing policies and practices. Dual-process theories have received growing attention in health behavior research because they offer two distinct pathways through which decisions are made: reactive (i.e., automatic) or reflective (i.e., deliberative). Progress in this area, however, has been stalled by theories that say little about when, why, where, and how reactive and reflective systems interact to sustain health behaviors over the long term. We propose that disruptions in daily life due to the covid-19 pandemic are ushering in an “era of flexible habits” where individuals will need to flexibly shift between reactive and reflective systems in order to maintain healthy behaviors.  In this webinar, we will discuss how intensive longitudinal data (ILD) collection and analytic strategies such as smartphone and sensor-based real-time activity and location monitoring, ecological momentary assessment (EMA), machine learning, and systems modeling are well-positioned to capture and interpret within-person “micro-shifts” between reactive and reflective systems underlying behavior maintenance. We will provide examples of how ILD can accelerate the development of theories and interventions to sustain health behavior during the Covid-19 pandemic and beyond.



 

Old School or New School? A Panel on Physical Activity Measurement
Date: August 6, 2020

The purpose of this meeting is to provide an opportunity for SBM PA SIG members to hear from experts in the physical activity measurement field. With the theme of measuring physical activity in the context of the new physical activity guidelines, this panel of experts will address the various methods to broadly measure physical activity, with an emphasis on criteria and consideration for selection. We will briefly review the new physical activity guidelines, followed by a lively discussion and Q&A related to measurement methods (e.g., questionnaires, accelerometry/activity monitors, Ecological Momentary Assessment) with input from our panel of experts. Rather than creating our own poll questions (as requested below), we hope to engage the SBM Twitter audience in the week leading up to the webinar so that we get their questions for the panelists.



 

Annual Meeting Webinar Series: In Pursuit of Principles that are Practical: How Integrating Mechanisms and Context will Advance the Study of Health Behavior Change
Date: June 26, 2020

In order to advance efforts to promote behavior change, guidelines are needed that specify not only why intervention strategies work, but also when, for what behaviors, and for whom, do these strategies promote change. Investigators need to be able to anticipate and respond to the heterogeneity in effects that presently characterizes intervention research. In this presentation, Dr. Rothman will describe how integrating the study of an intervention’s mechanism of action (the why question) with the specification of the contextual factors that regulate intervention effectiveness will afford the development of principles that can address our practical needs.



 

Annual Meeting Webinar Series: Riding the Wave of Digital Transformation in Science
Date: June 23, 2020

Our rapidly changing digital ecosystem changes both the questions and answers we pursue in behavioral medicine. Attend this master lecture to follow the trail of digital connectivity in science from its early roots in the national “co-laboratories” of the human genome, to the “artificial intelligence winter” in medicine, to a supernova of accelerations (both good and bad) enabled by cloud computing, big data, machine learning, ubiquitous social media, the “Internet of Things," and computer-assisted precision medicine.



 

Annual Meeting Webinar Series: How do We Know what Works? Emulating Randomized Trials when Trials are Not Available
Date: June 19, 2020

When randomized experiments are not feasible or available, causal effects are often estimated from non-experimental or observational databases. Therefore, causal inference from observational databases can be viewed as an attempt to emulate a hypothetical randomized experiment—the target experiment or target trial—that would quantify the causal effect of interest. This talk outlines an approach to observational causal inference that makes the target trial explicit.



 

Building Investigators' Resiliency and Commitment for Careers in Research
Date: June 18, 2020

Join us for a panel discussion featuring senior researchers with diverse portfolios of prior funding, who can share their stories and strategies for building and sustaining a career in research. Panelists will discuss tips for identifying funding sources, advantages and disadvantages of different funding mechanisms, the role of persistence and resubmitting, leveraging pilot studies, other personal lessons learned, etc.



 

Annual Meeting Webinar Series: Artificial Intelligence Meets Behaviour in Health: Hope, Hype, or Harm?
Date: June 16, 2020

In 2015, Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk, and dozens of the world’s top visionaries in artificial intelligence (AI) signed an open letter declaring “a broad consensus that AI research is progressing steadily, and that its impact on society is likely to increase.” Precisely because these capabilities are now expanding beyond the hypothetical, though, the letter went on to say “it is important to research how to reap its benefits while avoiding potential pitfalls.” The potential for both good and harm from these disruptive technologies is enormous. Understanding the future of these systems requires urgent, cross-disciplinary conversation. This panel will bring together three pioneering voices across the fields of computational science, behavioral medicine, and healthcare to identify the provocative questions that are urgently needed to guide the evolution of “intelligent systems” in medicine.



 

Annual Meeting Webinar Series: Presidential Symposium: From Ideas to Interventions: A Review of Frameworks for Designing and Optimizing Health-Related Behavioral Interventions
Date: June 12, 2020

Behavioral risk factors (e.g., tobacco use, adverse diet, sedentary lifestyles, overweight and obesity) are major contributors to chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Designing more effective interventions for these risk factors is critical to accelerating the impact of behavioral medicine on disease incidence, progression and recovery. While there exist a number of frameworks and process models aimed at promoting the careful, systematic design and optimization of behavioral interventions, little guidance is available to compare key aspects of these models, understand their common and unique features, and aid in selecting the best approach for a specific research question. In this symposium, several approaches to designing and optimizing interventions for behavioral risk factors will be reviewed to promote greater knowledge of each individual framework, advance our understanding of commonalities and synergies between the frameworks, and allow for an informed choice on the part of investigators interested in developing and testing health-related behavioral interventions.



 

Annual Meeting Webinar Series: Forging Forward Together: Transforming Scientific Practice to Accelerate Scientific Progress
Date: June 9, 2020

Today we face the challenge of modernizing legacy approaches of yesterday to enable us to address our increasingly complex health problems of tomorrow. Our behavioral medicine community has the opportunity to collectively re-envision, influence, and forge paths through deeply entrenched systems that can hinder scientific progress. These systems include structures in academia, policies for rewarding and recognizing researchers, approaches to pedagogy, training, and development, and infrastructures for and uses of technologies. Through the lens of cross-disciplinary team science, Kara Hall, PhD, will explore opportunities to accelerate our science and reflect on the use of science to transform the way we do science.



 

Annual Meeting Webinar Series: Presidential Panel Discussion: Sharing your Findings: Strategies for Effective and Engaging Science Communication
Date: June 5, 2020

Without science communication, research findings stay in academia. Although training opportunities are growing, it is not yet common practice to teach scientists communication skills concurrently with research training. For those that recognize the importance of science communication, it is often difficult to know where to begin and how to incorporate an added skillset into an already demanding workload. The goal of this panel is to give attendants a practical set of actions they can take to get started in science communication and considerations to keep in mind before they begin engaging in science co