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Behavior Change Grand Rounds

Tune in on select Thursdays at 1 p.m. ET to learn from the best and brightest in behavioral medicine.


Implications of NIH Clinical Trials Policies for Behavioral Research

William Riley
William Riley, PhD

Date: December 7, 2017

Time: 1 p.m. ET

William Riley, PhD, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), will discuss the breadth of the NIH definition of a clinical trial: essentially all experimental studies of humans are included. The webinar will describe in detail what is required of researchers who submit grants that meet this definition of a clinical trial. The efforts of OBSSR to ensure these policies accommodate behavioral and social science researchers also will be discussed. SBM Past-President Dawn Wilson, PhD, will moderate.

Click here to register. Registration is free for SBM members and $15 for non-members.

 


Capitol Hill Advocacy Tips

Wendy Naus
Wendy Naus

Date: December 14, 2017

Time: 1 p.m. ET

This webinar will provide strategies for advocating for health policy change on Capitol Hill. Wendy Naus, executive director of the Consortium of Social Science Associations, will present on how to develop and deliver salient talking points to legislative aides. Then, Joanna Buscemi, PhD, Marian Fitzgibbon, PhD, and Sara Knight, PhD, of SBM’s Health Policy Council, will share experiences and talking points from SBM’s recent advocacy visits with U.S. Senate offices. There will also be time for questions from participants.

Click here to register. Registration is free for SBM members and $15 for non-members.


Developing and Adapting Behavioral Interventions for Social Media Delivery

Sherry Pagoto
Sherry Pagoto, PhD

Date: December 21, 2017

Time: 1 p.m. ET

This webinar will provide practical guidance on how to develop and/or adapt behavioral intervention content to deliver in private online groups using commercial social media platforms like Facebook. Commercial social media platforms provide a free, confidential means to deliver behavioral programming to groups. Studies have used this model for weight management, smoking cessation, physical activity promotion, and parenting, among other topics. Presenter and SBM President-Elect Sherry Pagoto, PhD, a professor in the Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Connecticut, and moderator Danielle Arigo, PhD, will discuss user-centered design approaches to developing intervention content that can be distributed via social media posts, engagement strategies, social media marketing principles, and logistical issues (e.g., creating the group, scheduling posts, moderation, tracking engagement). They will discuss lessons learned from relevant studies using Facebook and Twitter, and will make recommendations for research steps from developmental, pilot, and randomized trial phases. Attendees will learn hands-on skills and have the opportunity to ask questions and discuss challenges.

Click here to register. Registration is free for SBM members and $15 for non-members.


Introduction to Optimization of Behavioral and Biobehavioral Interventions

Linda Collins
Linda Collins, PhD

Date: January 18, 2018

Time: 1 p.m. ET

Behavioral and biobehavioral interventions are typically developed and evaluated using the classical treatment package approach, in which an intervention is assembled a priori and evaluated by means of a two-group randomized controlled trial (RCT). Linda Collins, PhD, will describe an alternative framework called the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST). MOST, a principled approach inspired by ideas from engineering, includes the RCT for intervention evaluation, but also includes other steps before the RCT aimed at intervention optimization. Dr. Collins, director of the Methodology Center at Pennsylvania State University, will review how behavioral and biobehavioral interventions can be optimized using criteria chosen by the intervention scientist. The goal may be to develop a cost-effective intervention, an intervention that achieves a specified level of effectiveness, the briefest intervention that achieves a minimum level of effectiveness, or any other reasonable goal. This webinar is presented by SBM's Optimization of Behavioral and Biobehavioral Interventions Special Interest Group. The group's chair, Thelma Mielenz, PhD, will moderate.

Click here to register. Registration is free for SBM members and $15 for non-members.


The Opt-In Study to Optimize Intervention for Weight Loss Initiation

Linda Collins
Bonnie Spring, PhD, ABPP


Date: February 1, 2018

Time: 1 p.m. ET

SBM Past-President Bonnie Spring, PhD, will discuss the design, implementation, initial findings, and implications of the Opt-In study, a multiphase optimization strategy factorial experiment conducted to optimize a scalable intervention to foster weight loss initiation. A low-cost intervention designed to be delivered entirely remotely, the study tested the weight loss impact of five treatment components:  coaching dose, meal replacement recommendations, text messaging, reports to primary care provider, and supportiveness training for buddies. Dr. Spring directs the Institute for Public Health and Medicine at Northwestern University. This webinar is presented by SBM's Optimization of Behavioral and Biobehavioral Interventions Special Interest Group. The group's conference chair, Angela Pfammatter, PhD, will moderate.

Click here to register. Registration is free for SBM members and $15 for non-members.


Graduate School Basics: Managing Time, Money, Projects, and Professional Relationships

Britney Blair Jerel Calzo Stephanie Manasse

Britney Blair,
PsyD

Jerel Calzo,
PhD, MPH 

Stephanie Manasse,
PhD


Date: February 8, 2018

Time: 1 p.m. ET

Undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral members are invited to attend this webinar, which will feature a panel of recent advanced degree graduates and early career professionals sharing advice and reflections for staying sane and successful during your graduate school years. Specific topics covered will include: managing time well, making sound financial decisions, developing and managing a research project, and building professional connections.

Click here to register. Registration is free for SBM members and non-members.


Extending the Reach of Behavioral Medicine: Lessons Learned in Working with Policy Makers

Sarah Bleich Binta Beard

Sarah Bleich,
PhD

Binta Beard,
ScD, SM

   
   

Date: March 1, 2018

Time: 1 p.m. ET

In this webinar, Dr. Rachel Shelton, SBM Program Committee Chair, will interview Dr. Binta Beard, Managing Partner at Equinox Strategies, and Dr. Sarah Bleich, Professor of Public Health Policy at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, to learn about their career trajectories and their experience influencing policy and working with policy makers.

Click here to register. Registration is free for SBM members and non-members.


Introducing the Science of Behavior Change Online Repository of Measures of Behavior Change Mechanisms


Donald Edmondson, PhD, MPH

Date: March 29, 2018

Time: 1 p.m. ET

Supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund, the Science of Behavior Change (SOBC) program seeks to improve the understanding of mechanisms underlying human behavior change by applying an experimental medicine approach to behavior change research. This August, SOBC launched an internet-based measures repository where researchers can learn about and download measures of key behavior change mechanisms. Research funded during stage one of SOBC (2009-14) identified three broad classes of intervention targets that are highly relevant to the mechanisms underlying behavior change: self-regulation; stress reactivity and stress resilience; and interpersonal and social processes. This aided the development of a reliable and valid way to measure engaged targets through experimental manipulation or interventions. This measurement focus has been the foundation for the current stage two phase of the SOBC Research Network (2015-present). Initial findings from stage one have informed the population of the SOBC measures repository. An essential and unique feature of the repository is the documentation of a measure’s status through the three steps of the SOBC experimental medicine approach: (1) identify, (2) measure, and (3) influence. This webinar will walk attendees through the measures repository and highlight its value for the field.

Click here to register. Registration is free for SBM members and $15 for non-members.


Watch recordings of past SBM webinars.