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TTBCI SIG Presents: Do Standard Assessments of Self-Efficacy Tap Perceived Capability or Motivation?

TTBCI SIG Presents: Do Standard Assessments of Self-Efficacy Tap Perceived Capability or Motivation?

On Wednesday, February 22 at 1:00pm EST SBM's Theories and Techniques of Behavior Change Interventions SIG will host the first in a series of virtual brown bag webinars.

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Abstract: Consistent with self-efficacy theory, self-efficacy questionnaires ask respondents to indicate the extent to which they “can” perform the target behavior.  However, for behaviors that are under our volitional control—such as most health-related behaviors—the question of what people “can” do may serve as an indicator of broad motivation as well as perceived capability.  The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate through data from observational, qualitative, and intervention studies that, contrary to self-efficacy theory, self-efficacy ratings are influenced by multiple motivational factors, such as expected outcomes of health behavior, whether one likes or dislikes performing the behavior, and the social implications of the behavior. The implications of these findings are that as a broad indicator of motivation, ratings of self-efficacy do an excellent job of predicting the target behavior, but a poor job of helping us understand and intervene upon the myriad underlying factors that determine each person’s motivation.  We will discuss potential ways to assess perceived capability independent of motivation.