Seminars - Wednesday, March 30

Seminars are held on Wednesday. They include presentations by approximately three speakers. Speakers emphasize the theory and application of practical skills and interact with participants. Admission is by paid ticket only and seating is limited.

Seminar 2: SBIR and STTR, Federal Funding Mechanisms for Improving the Reach of Behavioral Science

9 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $100; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $50; Non-Members: $150
Content area: Education, Training and/or Career Development
Instructional level: Intermediate/Advanced

Lead Presenter: Patricia Weber, DrPH, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD

Co-Presenters: James McClain, PhD, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD; Jennifer Shieh, PhD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, CITY, STATE; Richard Bendis, BioHealth Innovation, Inc., CITY, STATE; Fred Kron, MD, Medical Cyberworlds, Inc., CITY, STATE

With growing interest in how the results of research are disseminated and implemented, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants and contracts are increasingly an avenue for the translation of scientific evidence into commercial and clinical settings. Representatives from the SBIR/STTR offices of two NIH Institutes, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), will provide an overview of the goals of the SBIR and STTR programs, the application and review process and how these differ from traditional research grants. An NCI Program Director from the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences will discuss the importance of the SBIR/STTR grant mechanism to the field of behavioral science. An SBIR awardee will give an overview of how he translated his academic behavioral research into a successful SBIR/STTR application. Finally, a seasoned healthcare investor will provide an overview of what investors are looking for from commercial behavioral health products and platforms.

Attendees will be expected to submit a one page overview of their product idea for commercialization prior to the seminar. Attendees will get detailed feedback from the presenters. Attendees will practice giving elevator pitches (short 2 min overview of their idea and its impact) similar to what might happen at a health tech event. Attendees will then give a more detailed overview of their research-informed product idea and commercialization plan, receiving feedback from the presenters.

Seminar 3: Integrating Behavioral Science in the Clinical Workflow and Changing Patient-Provider Relationships

9 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $100; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $50; Non-Members: $150
Content area: Diabetes
Instructional level: Beginner/Intermediate

Lead Presenter: Christine Renee Maldonado, PhD, Healthwise, Inc., Boise, ID

Co-Presenters: Carrie Henley, BA, Healthwise, Inc., Boise, ID; and Catherine D. Serio, PhD, Healthwise, Inc., Boise, ID

We know a great deal about what works (and what does not) in behavioral medicine. But like many fields, there is a gap between what is known and what is implemented in clinical practice and what is disseminated to the public. As both patients and providers grapple with the management of complex, chronic health conditions, there is an urgent need for information that goes beyond traditional health education and instead uses theory-based behavior change interventions in the clinical workflow. To help close the gap between theory and practice, the authors drew from the behavioral medicine literature and adopted the Sustainable Change Sequence (SCS; Elwyn, Marrin, Frosch, & White, 2014), a framework that outlines five steps that a patient needs to adopt in order to sustain health behavior change. This framework also outlines the respective evidenced-based behavior change techniques (BCTs) for each step as detailed by Abraham and Michie’s (2008) taxonomy. Together, the SCS and the BCTs have been at the forefront of our content strategy and development. To support providers in targeting health information to their patients’ respective behavior change step, the authors have developed a tool to assess patients’ health behavior change needs.  This assessment tool is linked through rich metadata to content that’s been tailored to patients’ specific needs. In this seminar, we will provide participants with an overview of the SCS and the underlying BCTs. We will demonstrate how a multi-disciplinary team of content developers apply the SCS and translate BCTs to produce health content that is in plain language. Participants will interact with our psychometrically-validated tool that supports providers in targeting content to their patients’ behavior change needs. Using type 2 diabetes as example, we will showcase how the SCS and BCTs, our tool, and our content work in concert to support both the patient-provider relationship and patients’ self-management efforts. Throughout the seminar participants will engage in discussions and activities to support their learning and adoption of similar frameworks in their organizations.

Seminar 6: The Path: A Nine Component Model and Methodology for Training Resilience

9 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $100; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $50; Non-Members: $150
Content area: Stress
Instructional level: Intermediate/advanced

Lead Presenter: Stephen Sideroff, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles, CA

Presenting a model of resilience, and a self-scoring assessment tool. Stress is a significant modifier of emotional and physical symptoms and is maintained unconsciously as a distraction from emotional pain. This resistance along with a feeling of overwhelm contributes to clients’ difficulty in becoming resilient. Session will identify the many aspects of client resistance to restoring autonomic balance and optimal functioning. Presenter will then introduce a nine component model of resilience along with a 40 item self-scored questionnaire that produces a resilience profile for clients, identifying their strengths and areas needing improvement. Seminar participants will have the opportunity to take the questionnaire, self-score and create their personal profile.  The nine components fall into three areas: Relationship (with self, with others, and with something greater – spirituality, purpose and service), Organismic Balance and Mastery (physical, mental/cognitive, and emotional) and Process or how one engages in the world (presence, flexibility and power, defined as the ability to get things done).  Each of the nine components will be described, along with exercises for their enhancement.  The audience will be engaged in training each other, using these exercises, to train greater resilience along each of the nine dimensions.

Seminar 7: Iterative Research Designs: Developing, Refining, and Pilot Testing Innovative Approaches to Promoting Behavior Change

9 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $100; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $50; Non-Members: $150
Content area: Diabetes
Instructional level: Intermediate/advanced

Lead Presenter: Sarah S. Jaser, PhD, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Co-Presenters: Deborah Ellis, PhD, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Nancy Petry, PhD, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT; Catherine Stanger, PhD, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH; Shelagh A. Mulvaney, PhD, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; and Christine M. Hunter, PhD, ABPP, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD

There is a need to develop new and better interventions to promote behavior change to address problems with adherence. Iterative research designs allow for studies to develop, refine, and pilot test innovative strategies. In this course, independently-funded investigators will share strategies for iterative research designs of behavioral interventions, with early feasibility phases informing larger trials. We draw from cognitive training (Cogmed), e-health and technology (interactive apps), positive psychology, mindfulness, and incentive-based approaches to address the same challenge: improving adherence in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. We will discuss iterative study designs, lessons learned, and tools for decision-making regarding intervention readiness for additional testing and development, including statistical approaches to evaluate small sample sizes. Topics covered in this course have wide-ranging implications for designing and testing behavioral interventions for youth with chronic diseases in particular and for the broader development of novel behavior change interventions.

Seminar 9: Beyond Informed Consent: Designing Impactful Orientation Sessions for Randomized Trials to Maximize Engagement and Retention

12 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $100; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $50; Non-Members: $150
Content area: Methods
Instructional level: Intermediate

Lead Presenter: Danielle E. Schoffman, University Of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Co-Presenters: Michaela Kiernan, PhD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Orientation sessions are often the first point of contact for research staff and participants and offer an important opportunity to set the tone of the research experience ahead. However, many studies do not take advantage of the time in orientation sessions to engage participants on a deep level in the research experience as well as provide participants with an understanding of the full commitment involved in enrolling. This interactive seminar will provide detailed examples that illustrate how techniques from an innovative approach were applied across a variety of research settings as well as an intensive hands-on session to assist attendees in their planning and implementation of similar techniques in their research.

First, presenters will briefly describe an innovative approach to orientation sessions developed by our collaborative research team. This approach emphasizes that trial participants should be partners in the research process, that a full and clear picture of the expectations for trial participation should be presented, and that trial participants should be allowed sufficient time and space to explore ambivalence about committing to the study rather than making a decision at a single visit. Second, presenters will describe details of how the original orientation session approach has now been adapted for use in a number of research projects, including different geographic locations across the US from the Southeast to California, age groups from children to adults, health behaviors from weight loss to physical activity, and research designs from in-person groups to remotely-delivered interventions. Third, presenters will facilitate intensive small-group break-out sessions for attendees to brainstorm ways to implement the orientation session techniques in their own research as well as troubleshoot anticipated barriers to using these techniques. The small groups will share strategies and solutions with the larger group and the presenters will share some of the commonly encountered barriers to implementation experienced by PIs and research staff. Finally, the presenters will discuss future directions including suggestions for systematic measurement of the techniques presented and empirical tests of the impact of specific elements of the approach on recruitment and retention process indicators. Participants will leave prepared to implement some of the orientation session techniques discussed.

Seminar 12: Building Just-In Time Adaptive Interventions in Mobile Health: The Role of Micro-Randomized Trials

3:15 p.m. - 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $100; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $50; Non-Members: $150
Content area: Methods
Instructional level: Beginner/intermediate

Lead Presenter: Inbal Nahum-Shani, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Co-Presenters: Susan Murphy, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Bonnie Spring, PhD, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; David E. Conroy, PhD, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA; Predrag Klasnja, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; and Daniel Almirall, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

A “Just-in-Time Adaptive Intervention” (JITAI) is an emerging mobile health intervention design aiming to provide support “just-in-time”, namely whenever and wherever support is needed; via “adaptation”, namely by using ongoing information on the dynamics of an individual’s emotional, social, physical and contextual state to individualize the type and delivery timing of support.  The adaptation in a JITAI is intended to ensure that the right type of support is provided whenever the person is (a) vulnerable and/or open to positive changes, and (b) receptive, namely able and willing to receive, process and utilize the support provided. In this workshop, we will introduce micro-randomized trial (MRT), a new trial design useful tool for addressing scientific questions concerning the construction of JITAIs. Specifically, we will provide an introduction to JITAIs, as well as examples of key scientific questions that need to be addressed in the development of these interventions. We will then discuss how the MRT design can be used to answer these scientific questions and clarify its key design features. Two case studies involving the design of a MRT will be used for illustration. The first concerns the development of a JITAI aiming to address states of heightened vulnerability among smokers attempting to quite. The second concerns the development of a JITAI aiming to capitalize on natural opportunities for promoting physical activity among sedentary adults. Useful data analysis methods for developing JITAIs will be discussed, as well as directions for future research. The emphasis of this seminar is on applications rather than on technical details.

Seminar 13: NIH Grantpersonship: Opportunities to Fund Research and Training

12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $125; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $75; Non-Members: $175
Content area: Other
Instructional level: Beginner/Intermediate

Lead Presenter: William N. Elwood, PhD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Co-Presenters: Stephane Philogene, PhD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Veronica L. Irvin, PhD, MPH, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR; Robert M. Kaplan, PhD, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD; Heather Orom, PhD, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY; Dawn K. Wilson, PhD, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Richard P. Moser, PhD, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; Janine Simmons, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Michael J. Stirratt, PhD, National Institute of Mental Health, Rockville, MD; and Christopher Wheldon, PhD, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

This seminar will provide participants with information and advice to write competitive applications for National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. The format will include didactic presentations, guidance on summary statement interpretation, and small group mentoring sessions. NIH scientists and review officers will describe current funding opportunities, grant mechanisms, policies, procedures, and steps in the grant submission process. Current and past NIH-based fellows will share experiences on how their fellowships influenced their respective career trajectories.

There will be ample time to answer questions regarding programmatic and review issues related to the NIH funding process. In addition, experiential and small-group activities will deepen participants’ knowledge of the grant writing process and provide individually-tailored feedback. Presenters will describe the roles and interactions among various study section participants, including the NIH review officer, review group chair, and assigned reviewers.

Participants who’d like tailored advice for their projects-in-development should bring at least five paper copies of a one- to two-page synopsis of the research aims, hypotheses, and methods. Participants interested in fellowship opportunities should bring a similar number of vitae/biosketches. NIH staff and senior investigators will provide participants with detailed feedback and advice.

Seminar 14: The Nuts and Bolts of Behavioral Intervention Development

12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $125; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $75; Non-Members: $175
Content area: Methods
Instructional level: Beginner/intermediate

Lead Presenters: Sylvie Naar, PhD, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; and Susan M. Czajkowski, PhD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD

Co-Presenters: Christine M. Hunter, PhD, ABPP, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD; Yuan Ji, PhD, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL; Audrey Boruvka, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Inbal Nahum-Shani, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Frank Perna, EdD, PhD, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; Bethany Raiff, PhD, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ; Kenneth E. Freedland, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis, St Louis, MO; and Angela J. Jacques-Tiura, PhD, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

This seminar will provide investigators who are interested in the design and preliminary testing of health-related behavioral interventions an opportunity to: (1) learn about the ORBIT model, a new framework for developing behavioral treatments for chronic diseases; (2) learn about appropriate study designs and methods for early-phase behavioral intervention research, including which methods are appropriate at each phase of the behavioral intervention development process; and (3) apply the ORBIT model and knowledge about relevant methodologies to their own behavioral treatment research.  The format will include didactic presentations, question and answer sessions, and small group discussions in which participants will be provided with advice to help them design their own behavioral intervention development project.  NIH and extramural behavioral scientists will describe their own experiences in designing and conducting behavioral intervention development studies, bringing these “lessons learned” to bear in advising seminar attendees on their individual projects.

Didactic presentations will provide detailed information about methodologies and study designs most applicable to the early phases of behavioral intervention design and testing (e.g., qualitative research and small-N studies, dose-finding studies, adaptive and fractional factorial designs, and pilot studies), with ample time allotted for questions and discussion. In addition, experiential and small-group activities will deepen participants’ knowledge of and skills needed for designing a behavioral intervention development program, allowing time for tailored advice and feedback. Participants will be asked to submit in advance a 1-2 page synopsis (e.g., abstract, research aims, hypotheses, proposed methods) of a behavioral intervention development project, which can be one they are considering submitting for funding, along with specific questions they may have regarding the process of behavioral intervention development. These will be discussed in small groups led by NIH staff and senior investigators, allowing participants to receive detailed feedback and advice to enhance the quality of their grant applications for designing, refining and early-phase testing of health-related behavioral interventions.

Seminar 16: Understanding the Principles at Work in Mind-Body Programmes and Integrating those into Behavior Change Interventions

12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $125; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $75; Non-Members: $175
Content area: Complementary and Integrative Medicine
Instructional level: Intermediate/advanced

Lead Presenter: James Carmody, PhD, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA

Behavioral interventions increasingly incorporate mindfulness and other mind-body modalities to support change and maintenance of health-related behaviors and better coping with the distress commonly accompanying unhealthy behaviors. These practices allow experiential recognition of the areas of experience that attention and awareness get caught, and those avoided or missed. Cultivating a capacity to recognize and hold our most difficult parts while still being available for the broader landscape of experience enables creative responding where automatic reactivity and conditioned patterns would otherwise prevail. Although often presented as unique, mind body modalities have their effects through shared psychological principles that are readily learned and adapted. This full day seminar will give participants both the theory and practice of these qualities of attending that are associated with distress and well-being and demonstrate the common ground mindfulness and other mind body programmes share with therapeutic modalities such as CBT. Understanding these parallels enables their seamless integration into behavioral change interventions that suit the needs, language and circumstances of your population. The seminar will provide experiential instruction drawn from the presenter’s own research and clinical experience as well as four decades of practice and teaching mindfulness meditation, yoga and mindful movement. There will be opportunity for dialogue, reflection and role-play in creatively adapting, presenting and teaching these principles in ways that make them meaningful and accessible for clients’ individual circumstances including awareness exercises that can be integrated into the experience of daily life. It is suitable for a range of backgrounds. Learning Objectives: Understand theoretical underpinnings of mind body modalities; Practice these principles using mindfulness and mind body exercises; Adapt what is learned to various patient circumstances.