Courses - Wednesday, March 30

Courses are held on Wednesday. These sessions typically last a half day and feature numerous speakers focused on a specific topic. Admission to courses is by paid ticket only and seating is limited.

Course 1: Cancer and Ethnic Minority and Multicultural Health SIGs Course: Let's Talk about Your Career: What You Need to Know about Grants, Mentorship and Life Balance

9 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $100; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $70; Non-Members: $115
Content area: Education, training, and/or career development
Instructional level: Beginner/intermediate

Co-Chairs: Lara Traeger, PhD, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA; Felicity Harper, PhD, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI; Qian Lu, MD, PhD, University of Houston, Houston, TX; Jamilia Sly, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Shobha Srinivasan, PhD, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; Cathy Meade, PhD, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL

Co-Presenters: Shobha Srinivasan, PhD, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; and Cathy Meade, PhD, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL

This session comprises three activities focused on early career grant funding, mentorship relationships, and life balance. First, a panel of experts in cancer and ethnic minority & multicultural health research will address key strategies for developing successful grant proposals. Then, we will demonstrate a study section review for two previously-selected proposals. Finally, we will host three roundtables on 1) Mentorship: identifying and utilizing local and distant mentoring relationships, 2) Successful strategies for landing you next position, and 3) Optimizing life balance. Attendees will be able to discuss their questions with diverse clinical research experts; observe the study section process; gain insight into early career considerations; and participate in two roundtables of their choice.

Course 2: Advanced Design and Conduct of Randomized Behavioral Clinical Trials

9 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $75; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $45; Non-Members: $90
Content area:
Instructional level: Intermediate/advanced

Chair: Peter G. Kaufmann, PhD, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD

Co-Presenters: Lynda H. Powell, PhD, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; Kenneth Freedland, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO

In this workshop we will discuss several principal challenges in the design of clinical trials. Important targets for multi-level interventions include biological response, social connections, provider behavior, health care system performance, community resources, and the physical environment. Multilevel interventions pose unique challenges for recruitment, randomization, selecting the unit of analysis, and treatment contamination. The results of behavioral intervention trials depend to a considerable extent on the nature of the selected comparators. A growing empirical literature on the effects of different control groups on behavioral trial outcomes will be discussed. Finally, the outcome of clinical trial depends critically on estimation of a meaningful effect size. Systematic estimation of a Minimal Clinically Important Difference is an important approach with important implications for the interpretation of the effectiveness of the delivered interventions.

Course 3: Health Policy Committee Course: Making a Greater Impact: How You can Advocate for Health Policy Change

9 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $75; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $45; Non-Members: $90
Content area: Other
Instructional level: Beginner/intermediate

Chair: Joanna Buscemi, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL

The Society of Behavioral Medicine’s Health Policy Committee (HPC) develops health policy briefs on important issues in public health which align with SBM’s mission. The HPC encourages members to develop ideas for health policy briefs and to submit proposals for briefs to the committee. The purpose of the preconference workshop is to provide members with background regarding the role of the HPC, to describe how briefs are developed and then disseminated including engaging partners who will endorse the briefs, and to give members some hands on training in crafting their own health policy brief. Attendees will be asked to come to the workshop with an idea for a health policy brief, and we will work with members to help refine their ideas to draft an effective and impactful health policy brief. We will close with discussion on how SBM health policy briefs are presented to legislative aides on Capitol Hill, and how the development and dissemination of the briefs are an important part of advocacy.

Course 4: Optimization of Behavioral Interventions SIG Course: Introduction to the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) for Building More Effective, Efficient, Economical, and Scalable Behavioral and Biobehavioral Interventions

12 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $108; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $78; Non-Members: $12
Content area: Methods
Instructional level: Beginner/intermediate

Chair: Linda M. Collins, PhD, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA

Presenter: Linda M. Collins, PhD, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA

The majority of behavioral and biobehavioral interventions in use today have been evaluated as a treatment package using a two-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT). This approach is an excellent way to determine whether an intervention is effective. However, the treatment package approach is less helpful in providing empirical information that can be used to optimize the intervention to achieve improved effectiveness while maintaining a desired level of efficiency, economy, and/or scalability. In this seminar an innovative methodological framework for optimizing behavioral interventions, the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST), will be presented. MOST is based on ideas inspired by engineering methods, which stress careful management of research resources and ongoing improvement of products. MOST is a comprehensive strategy that includes three phases:  preparation, optimization, and evaluation. MOST can be used to build a new intervention or to improve an existing intervention. Using MOST it is possible to engineer an intervention targeting a particular effect size, level of cost-effectiveness, or any other criterion.

This seminar will provide an introduction to MOST. Ongoing intervention development studies using the MOST approach will be used as illustrative examples. A substantial amount of time will be devoted to experimental design, which is an important tool in MOST. In particular, factorial experiments and fractional factorial experiments will be discussed. Time will be reserved for open discussion of how the concepts presented can be applied in the research of seminar attendees.  Attendees will be given a handout with the Power Point slides and a list of articles containing additional information.

Course 5: Cancer SIG Course: Precision Behavioral Medicine in Cancer: Personalization across the Cancer Care Continuum

3:15 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $100; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $70; Non-Members: $115
Content area: Cancer
Instructional level: Intermediate/advanced

Co-Chairs: Kristi Graves, PhD, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; and Catherine Alfano, PhD, American Cancer Society, Inc., Rockville, MD

Co-Presenters: Catherine Alfano, PhD, American Cancer Society, Inc., Rockville, MD; Catharine Wang, PhD, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and Roxanne Jensen, PhD, Georgetown University, Washington, DC

The purpose of the course is to define and discuss ‘Precision Medicine’ in terms of personalized cancer care for individuals at risk, diagnosed with and surviving cancer. Speakers will describe the current context of personalized cancer care in terms of genomics, lifestyle, culture, patient-reported outcomes and health literacy. Speakers will identify different approaches to precision cancer medicine so that we understand what it is and how to best assess and implement precision medicine in behavioral medicine interventions, research and clinical settings. Speakers and the discussant will identify knowledge gaps and specific research recommendations for future work to improve research, interventions and clinical care for all cancer patients and survivors. Topics will be relevant for other common chronic diseases and patients of varying ages.

Course 6: Evidence-Based Behavioral Medicine SIG, Scientific and Professional Liaison Council, Cancer and Theories and Techniques of Behavioral Medicine SIGs Course: Network Meta-Analysis for Behavioral Trials: An Introduction and Overview

3:15 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $75; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $45; Non-Members: $90
Content area: Methods
Instructional level: Intermediate/advanced

Chair: Tianjing Li, MD, MHS, PhD, US Cochrane Center, Baltimore, MD

Results from conventional pair-wise meta-analyses, while helpful in synthesizing and evaluating results from clinical trials, may make it difficult to determine which intervention is most effective among all available options. Network meta-analysis is a new and growing statistical approach that addresses the limitations of traditional pair-wise meta-analytic techniques. This approach allows for the synthesis of data from both direct and indirect comparisons and the ranking of interventions in order of efficacy. Participants will receive an introduction to indirect comparison and network meta-analysis and learn about how and when these approaches should be used. The workshop will also include hands-on activities tailored to the participants’ interests in learning about presenting and communicating findings and/or programming for a network meta-analysis.

Course 7: Integrated Primary Care and Military and Veterans Health SIGs Course: Emerging Population-Based Approaches to Integrated Primary Care

3:15 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $108; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $78; Non-Members: $123
Content area: Primary care
Instructional level: Beginner/intermediate

Chair: James E. Aikens, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Co-Presenters: Christopher L. Hunter, PhD, ABPP, Defense Health Headquarters, Falls Church, VA; Rodger Kessler PhD, ABPP, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT; and Margaret Dundon, PhD, VHA National Center for Health, Buffalo, NY

This pre-conference course features three internationally renowned speakers who will discuss cutting-edge population-based approaches to transform integrated behavioral health in primary care. This field has evolved beyond simple models focused on individual patient visits; the entire empanelment of a primary care clinic must be targeted to produce real change in healthcare delivery and population health. However, existing evidence-based clinical interventions are often applied ineffectively or not at all. The first segment of the course will cover the “Clinical Pathways” approach to help ensure that integrated primary care behavioral health providers (BHPs) apply evidence-based interventions. It will include coverage of BHP tools for eight common clinical issues: diabetes, obesity, pain, insomnia, tobacco use, alcohol misuse, anxiety, and depression. The next segment will concern the innovative “Triple Aims Model” of value-based, sustainable behavioral health services in Patient Centered Medical Homes (per Kathol, DeGruy, & Rollman, 2014). It will also use type 2 diabetes risk as an example to focus upon model implementation using electronic health data. The final segment will cover the Veterans Administration’s national-level integration of health promotion and disease prevention into Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACTs). This model revolves around “Health Behavior Coordinators” (HBCs), who not only support clinicians but also develop and implement multi-level strategies for reducing risky behaviors, adopting healthy behaviors, and obtaining preventive care.

Course 8: Ethnic Minority and Multicultural Health SIG Course: Unchanging Paradigms: The Static Condition of Reducing Health Inequities

12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $95; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $57; Non-Members: $115
Content area: Other
Instructional level: Beginner/intermediate

Co-Chairs: Sabrina Ford, PhD, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; and Jamilia Sly, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY

Co-Presenters: Qian Lu, PhD, University of Houston, Houston, TX; Kimlin Tam Ashing, PhD, City of Hope, Duarte, CA; Sabrina Ford, PhD, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; Jamilia Sly, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; David Williams, PhD, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Although formal acknowledgement in the public health arena has focused on reducing health inequities for over 60 years, very little has changed in terms of the continued disparate health outcomes for underserved and minority populations. We propose to unravel where research and practice has brought us to date, offer an innovative models to move beyond the current state, and explore unconscious bias.

Course 9: Technology SIG Course: Designing Digital Health Interventions: A Workshop on How to Create Usable, Enjoyable, and Effective Digital Health User Experiences

12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $128; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $90; Non-Members: $148
Content area: Other
Instructional level: Beginner/intermediate

Chair: Eric B. Hekler, PhD, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ

Co-Presenters: Predrag Klasnja, PhD, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Sayali Phatak, MS, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ; David Klein, Vibrent Health, Fairfax, VA; Eric B. Hekler, PhD, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ; and Eun Kyoung Choe, PhD, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA

Have you ever wondered why some digital health interventions (i.e., interventions that are delivered or incorporate digital technologies such as websites, smartphones, or wearable sensors like physical activity monitors) succeed at promoting behavior change, but others fail?  While increasing evidence suggests that technologies such as text messaging, websites, smartphone apps, and social networks can promote health behavior change, many times the low number of sustained users hampers the overall effectiveness of the intervention. Factors such as how well the technology integrates into a person’s life, how easy it is to interact with it, how enjoyable it is to use greatly influence a digital health intervention’s chances of success. The discipline of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) explores novel ways to make technologies more useful AND usable in everyday life (Poole, 2013).  In this workshop, HCI experts and behavioral scientists with experience using HCI design processes and collaborating with HCI researchers will introduce an overarching development process for improving user experience in digital health interventions called human-centered design. The workshop will focus on two core themes: 1) facilitation of early formative work to ensure a question is being asked appropriately, see IDEO Human-Centered Design Kit for a sense of the work; and 2) teaching pragmatic skills in rapid prototyping of mHealth (i.e., text messaging and app) ideas utilizing a variety of open tools such as ifttt.com, and pacoapp.com. This workshop is intended for behavioral scientists who are interested in developing a digital health intervention, or want to improve upon the design of an empirically-tested digital health intervention. No technology development or artistic skills are required.

Course 10: Theories and Techniques of Behavior Change Interventions SIG Course: Applying Self-Determination Theory to Health-Behavior Interventions

9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Fee: Full/Associate/Emeritus Members: $218; Student/Trainee or Transitional Members: $172; Non-Members: $243
Content area: Other
Instructional level: Intermediate/advanced

Chair: Jennifer La Guardia, PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA

Presenter: Jennifer La Guardia, PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA

Self-Determination Theory is one of the leading psychological theories on motivation & a powerful cornerstone to building a successful health initiative, program or intervention.  In this training, attendees will gain a deeper understanding of SDT principles & discover precisely why SDT provides a powerful framework for: (1) Improving motivation for behavior change, (2) Cultivating value for important health behaviors, (3) Creating meaningful goals, (4) Learn to practically apply the SDT framework in actionable ways, helping researchers and practitioners translate theory into practice, (5)  Explore how SDT is synergistic with your health initiatives, program, or intervention and can help create lasting change and improved long-term health outcomes, (6) Learn how to utilize SDT in different modes of treatment delivery (including mobile health, individual, and group modalities), and (7) Distinguish the SDT approach from other prominent interventions (MI, CBT, Stages of Change).